Full share or half share – what is right for me?

Trying to decide if the full share or rather sharing-a-share is the right thing to do for you? Here are some pointers:

The size of the share changes a bit throughout the season: the first and second week are usually smallish, but then the share picks up quickly and gets very abundant. Look here for some photo’s of single shares from previous years to get a better feel for it.

Generally speaking: the full share is great for families, the half share is great for singles. Vegetarian couples often choose a full share, omnivore couples often choose to split a share with someone else. But we have a member who is single and has a full share each year, and we have families with kids that prefer to share with others.

My husband and I (omnivores) have a full share to ourselves and one of the reasons is, that an abundance of veggies in our fridge inspires us to cook and eat more of them. This is how Nina Planck put it:

I notice two common mistakes with vegetables. First, people don’t buy enough, with predictable results: They don’t cook or eat enough vegetables. If your fridge isn’t packed with fresh produce, you won’t have a couple of vegetables at every meal. I’d rather throw away old vegetables— and often do— than do without at supper time. 1

When my husband and I reach a point where we feel overwhelmed by too much of the veggie-abundance, and short cuts like juicing (you can consume gigantic amounts of greens this way) are not what we want to do, and if there is also no time to ferment or otherwise preserve some veggie-goodies for lean times ahead, then I do this: I only take what I really, really want for next week from my official share, and leave the rest at the pick up spot. Each week, any leftovers at the CSA pickup spot are donated to the food kitchen of the Goodwill Rescue Mission on University Avenue in downtown Newark – so if I do not need it all or want it all, it still does not go to waist but to a very good cause. I never have to feel bad if I choose only to take a portion of my share – it really is a great thing for someone else.

Hope this helps some you you to make the decision that is right FOR YOU.

If you decide on sharing-a-share, please also read our blog post about this, which you can find here.

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1 The quote above is from Nina Planck’s book: Real Food for Mother and Baby: The Fertility Diet, Eating for Two, and Baby’s First Foods. Here the slightly longer quote:

I notice two common mistakes with vegetables. First, people don’t buy enough, with predictable results: They don’t cook or eat enough vegetables. If your fridge isn’t packed with fresh produce, you won’t have a couple of vegetables at every meal. I’d rather throw away old vegetables— and often do— than do without at supper time. The same goes for fruit. If the fruit bowl isn’t full, your family is not eating fruit. Second, people worry too much about how to cook vegetables. They’re overreliant on recipes, and for some odd reason, dishes must be complicated. You make a list of ingredients, shop, dice, blanch, sauté, make a sauce, bake . . . Who has time for this? I sometimes enjoy these complex, layered numbers in restaurants, but not at home. There is no need to get fancy. I make vegetables at every meal, every day, all year. Here’s how: * Take one vegetable. * Add one fat and one flavor, or maybe two. * Salt it. That’s it. The flavor— garlic, fresh herbs, hot peppers— is optional. The fat and salt, however, are not.

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